Test websites. Remote usability testing means getting paid to navigate a website for the first time and giving feedback to the website owner. Most tests take approximately 15 minutes, and you can get paid up to $10 for each test. A test involves performing a scenario on the client’s website and recording yourself doing it. For example, you might be asked to go through the process of selecting and purchasing an item on a retailer’s website.[1]

Deliver newspapers every morning if there's a route in your community. Find out if there are routes available in your area by contacting your local newspaper. Collect your bag of papers each morning and ride your bike from house to house to hand them out or have your parents drive you around. Most newspapers have to be delivered very early around 5 a.m. so be prepared to wake up at the crack of dawn.[14]


That being said, LinkConnector’s platform looks and feels outdated and is rather clumsily designed. Their dashboard also makes it difficult to find “hot” products or compare conversion rates, leaving affiliates somewhat in the dark about which products to choose. Ironically, despite their low-quality website, they offer some of the best customer service in the affiliate space.
Between sites like Coursera and apps like SkillShare, it should be easy for you to sell your skills to make some extra cash. In order to start making money this way, you need to do a few things first. Obviously, the first thing you need to do is compile a list of the things you are good at. You could be good at painting landscapes, drawing faces, creating resumes, or making small crafts. Everyone is good at something, the hardest part is finding out not only what that is, but if it can be seen as profitable. After you have devised a list of your talents, do some online research and see what you come up with for each skill. Look for things like, what the top people are doing with their skill, how much are they selling it for, how are they adding value to their item, and how they are communicating with their loyal customers. Things like that you need to list out. Ask as many questions as you want, just make sure and find all of the answers. Remember, start small, don’t become frustrated and you’ll be able to go anywhere. By the way, if you do this one right, you could actually start your own business from finding and selling your skills.
If the above locations do not yield information pertaining to affiliates, it may be the case that there exists a non-public affiliate program. Utilizing one of the common website correlation methods may provide clues about the affiliate network. The most definitive method for finding this information is to contact the website owner directly if a contact method can be located.
Consider selling in lots. A lot is a collection of similar items that is sold in a group. For example, if you have a collection of books, magazines or similar pieces of jewelry, consider selling them all at once in a lot. You many not make as much money as you would have if you sold each item separately. However, the items will likely sell more quickly in a lot than they would individually.[29]
Affiliates discussed the issues in Internet forums and began to organize their efforts. They believed that the best way to address the problem was to discourage merchants from advertising via adware. Merchants that were either indifferent to or supportive of adware were exposed by affiliates, thus damaging those merchants' reputations and tarnishing their affiliate marketing efforts. Many affiliates either terminated the use of such merchants or switched to a competitor's affiliate program. Eventually, affiliate networks were also forced by merchants and affiliates to take a stand and ban certain adware publishers from their network. The result was Code of Conduct by Commission Junction/beFree and Performics,[35] LinkShare's Anti-Predatory Advertising Addendum,[36] and ShareASale's complete ban of software applications as a medium for affiliates to promote advertiser offers.[37] Regardless of the progress made, adware continues to be an issue, as demonstrated by the class action lawsuit against ValueClick and its daughter company Commission Junction filed on April 20, 2007.[38]
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